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All Posts By Michael Lecours, CFP®

Political Impacts on your Investments

Since Donald Trump was elected in early November, the US stock market has surged to new heights.  We have fielded dozens of phone calls from clients asking how we are viewing this situation.  Below is a summary of our thoughts:

  • We believe this a tortoise vs hare race in terms of investing.  Lots of investors are piling into the market right now as they don’t want to miss this surge.  Or they are seeing unbelievable opportunities.  Caution is being replaced by exuberance for some investors.  This is the first time since the recession of 2008 and 2009, that we are hearing investors feel confident and optimistic in the markets.  This kind of knee-jerk reaction reminds me of the story about the tortoise and the hare, where the hare is overly confident in his abilities while the tortoise remains steady and purposefully in his pursuit. In this case, we will gladly be the tortoise. We will continue our steadfast approach to investing and will not deviate from our process.
  • What’s changed since trump’s election: Trump has continued to tweet his positions and that has been well received by the market.  No policies have been actually implemented, yet the market is pricing itself as though the policies have been implemented.  We all know intuitively that a president can’t just snap his fingers to make things happen.  As Trump hits resistance in implementing his plans, we expect the stock market to overreact to the bad news.  We expect more volatility this year as the market tries to correctly price itself based on the actions and words (and tweets) from an unconventional, and unpredictable leader.
  • Foreign Opportunities: As measured by valuations, the US stock market is expensive to invest in right now.  But when we look oversees, we see stocks on sale.  When the 2008 and 2009 recession occurred, the US stock market came back and has reached new highs, but many of the foreign markets have continued to muddle along over the last few years.  One related item is how the dollar will do relative to other currencies – if the dollar continues to strengthen, it could mute any returns we see abroad.
  • Small Cap Opportunities:  As the US and other countries embrace a more nationalistic attitude, foreign trade will likely be affected.  This means, that large US companies that see a significant profit coming from overseas trading will likely be hurt thanks to tariffs.  On the flip side, smaller US companies that serve mostly customers in the US will likely do better since they will not have to compete as much with foreign companies (bc there goods would be slapped with tariffs coming into the US).

Bottom line:  While we do see some opportunities, we plan to maintain a defensive approach to investing.  We see the current run up in stock prices to be unwarranted and that there will be a reversion to the mean at some point.  The opposite is true when looking abroad – the foreign markets have limped along for too long and we expect a reversion to the mean to occur at some point.

Why the Dow Jones Reaching 20,000 Is Not As Important As You May Think

The big headline the other day was news of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) reaching 20,000 for the first time. It’s gathered headlines all over the world. I counted 13 articles in The Wall Street Journal about the Dow 20,000. Most of the mainstream media has been quick to jump on what this means for investors, the market, and the future. And some of that thinking is flawed. This post will focus on putting this milestone in perspective for you and, more importantly, what it means for your investments.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is probably the most iconic index. When someone says the market is up 150 points, they are referring to the DJIA. It has a long track record – about 130 years! So on the surface this milestone is impressive. It took the Dow over 100 years to reach 10,000. It took 18 years for it to reach 20,000. But it took only 42 days to go from 19,000 to 20,000. That’s the second fastest thousand point gain in history. So what does that mean for you? To answer that, we need to pull pack the curtain to understand what is the Dow Jones Industrial Average:

  • It is an index consisting of 30 companies. That’s a very small representation of the overall market and can completely misrepresent how the whole market is doing in reality.
  • The Dow Jones is 100% US stocks which represent a single asset class. On top of that, it skews heavily toward large-cap industrial companies. This may have been valuable 130 years ago when the index was first created, but the economy has changed drastically since this index was first created. No longer are industrial companies an accurate representation of the overall market like they once were.
  • A company is included in the DJIA because it was selected by a committee of the Wall Street Journal. They actively decide which companies should be included and which should be removed.
  • The common methodology to determine the weighting of each company is very unusual. Most modern indexes are weighted based on the market capitalization – the bigger the company, the larger representation it holds in the index. The DJIA weights the company based on the share price of each stock. The larger the price per share, the larger the weight in the index. That puts Goldman Sachs as the largest holding at about 8% and GE at the second lowest (about 1%). This reason for this methodology dates back to a time before computers when a simple methodology was needed.
  • Here is a technical issue – the DJIA was prone to inaccurate calculations before computers were used to track the index. In going back to the very beginning and correcting all the mistakes, the DJIA passed 30,000 last month.
  • While you can’t invest directly in indexes, you can invest in indexes the mimic and replicate the performance of the underlying index. When you total the dollar amount that tracks the DJIA, it adds up to about $36 billion. To put that in perspective – over $2 trillion track some version of the S&P 500!

As you can see, this is a deeply flawed and outdated index. It serves very little use for most investors because of these flaws. It is not a good gauge of the overall health of the market or the economy. It barely does a good job of capturing the health of industrial segment of our economy in the US. It should never compared to a broad, diversified investment portfolio. So the Dow reaching 20,000 is a big story about an out-of-date index.